University of Neuchâtel

The University of Neuchâtel (UniNE) is a French-speaking university in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. The University has five faculties (schools) and more than a dozen institutes, including arts and human sciences, natural sciences, law, economics and theology. The Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences is the largest school of those that comprise the University of Neuchâtel with 1,500 students. The University of Neuchâtel superseded the Academy, which was created in 1838 by King Frederick William IV of Prussia, Prince of Neuchâtel. It awarded licentiate academic degrees in arts and in sciences. In 1848, the Grand Council decreed the closing of the Academy and in 1866 a new "academy" was established.

The university has an annual budget of CHF 120 million and an annual research fund of CHF 40 million. Approximately 4,000 students, including 500 PhD students attend the university, and more than 600 diplomas, licences, doctorates and certificates are awarded each year. The university has more than 1100 employees.

The University of Neuchâtel is situated at the heart of the French-speaking region of Switzerland, in Neuchâtel.

Before 2005, the University of Neuchâtel followed the French education model with some minor differences. The University now follows the academic standards of the Bologna Process which proposes a three-tiered system of university degrees, namely Bachelor degree, Master degree and Doctorate.

The University of Neuchâtel is a French-speaking university. However, certain Master and postgraduate programs are taught in French and English, or exclusively in English. For the 2010-2011 academic year, more than 4200 students from Switzerland and abroad (almost 20% foreign students) were enrolled.

Read more about University Of Neuchâtel:  Faculties, NSF Research Commission, Institut De Langue Et Civilisation Françaises (ILCF), People Linked To The University, Honorary Doctorates

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