University of Illinois At Chicago College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs

University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs

The College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs (CUPPA) is a nationally recognized innovator in education, research, and engagement in support of the nation's cities and metropolitan areas at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Illinois. Its adherence to a unique blend of basic research, university-community engagement, policy analysis, and profession-based graduate programs attracts the best and brightest students and reinforces the connections between its research centers and its academic programs.

Read more about University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs:  Facilities, Degrees, Mission, Values, Student Body

Other articles related to "public, urban, university of illinois at chicago":

University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs - Student Body
... CUPPA's Public Administration and Urban Planning and Policy programs consist of more than 500 students from all walks of life ... The University of Illinois at Chicago maintains no ethnic majority, and CUPPA has students and/or alumni representing almost every continent on the globe ...

Famous quotes containing the words university of, planning, public, urban, affairs, illinois, university, chicago and/or college:

    The information links are like nerves that pervade and help to animate the human organism. The sensors and monitors are analogous to the human senses that put us in touch with the world. Data bases correspond to memory; the information processors perform the function of human reasoning and comprehension. Once the postmodern infrastructure is reasonably integrated, it will greatly exceed human intelligence in reach, acuity, capacity, and precision.
    Albert Borgman, U.S. educator, author. Crossing the Postmodern Divide, ch. 4, University of Chicago Press (1992)

    Most literature on the culture of adolescence focuses on peer pressure as a negative force. Warnings about the “wrong crowd” read like tornado alerts in parent manuals. . . . It is a relative term that means different things in different places. In Fort Wayne, for example, the wrong crowd meant hanging out with liberal Democrats. In Connecticut, it meant kids who weren’t planning to get a Ph.D. from Yale.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    Anything goes in Wichita. Leave your revolvers at police headquarters and get a check.
    —For the State of Kansas, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    A peasant becomes fond of his pig and is glad to salt away its pork. What is significant, and is so difficult for the urban stranger to understand, is that the two statements are connected by an and and not by a but.
    John Berger (b. 1926)

    Secrecy is the first essential in affairs of the State.
    Duc De Richelieu (1585–1642)

    An Illinois woman has invented a portable house which can be carried about in a cart or expressed to the seashore. It has also folding furniture and a complete camping outfit.
    Lydia Hoyt Farmer (1842–1903)

    I was now at a university in New York, a professor of existential psychology with the not inconsiderable thesis that magic, dread, and the perception of death were the roots of motivation.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)

    If you have any information or evidence regarding the O.J. Simpson case, press 2 now. If you are an expert in fields relating to the O.J. Simpson case and would like to offer your services, press 3 now. If you would like the address where you can send a letter of support to O.J. Simpson, press 1 now. If you are seeking legal representation from the law offices of Robert L. Shapiro, press 4 now.
    Advertisement. Aired August 8, 1994 by Tom Snyder on TV station CNBC. Chicago Sun Times, p. 11 (July 24, 1994)

    ... [a] girl one day flared out and told the principal “the only mission opening before a girl in his school was to marry one of those candidates [for the ministry].” He said he didn’t know but it was. And when at last that same girl announced her desire and intention to go to college it was received with about the same incredulity and dismay as if a brass button on one of those candidate’s coats had propounded a new method for squaring the circle or trisecting the arc.
    Anna Julia Cooper (1859–1964)