University of Illinois At Chicago College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs

University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs

The College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs (CUPPA) is a nationally recognized innovator in education, research, and engagement in support of the nation's cities and metropolitan areas at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Illinois. Its adherence to a unique blend of basic research, university-community engagement, policy analysis, and profession-based graduate programs attracts the best and brightest students and reinforces the connections between its research centers and its academic programs.

Read more about University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs:  Facilities, Degrees, Mission, Values, Student Body

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University Of Illinois At Chicago College Of Urban Planning And Public Affairs - Student Body
... CUPPA's Public Administration and Urban Planning and Policy programs consist of more than 500 students from all walks of life ... The University of Illinois at Chicago maintains no ethnic majority, and CUPPA has students and/or alumni representing almost every continent on the globe ...

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