University of Brighton

The University of Brighton is a UK university of over 21,000 students and 2,500 staff based on five campuses in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings on the south coast of England. It has one of the best teaching quality ratings in the UK and a strong research record, factors which contribute to its reputation as a leading post-1992 university. Its roots can be traced back to 1859 when the Brighton School of Art was opened in the Brighton Royal Pavilion. The university focuses on professional education, with the majority of degrees awarded also leading to professional qualifications.

In 2012 the University of Brighton came third in the People & Planet’s Green League table of UK universities ranked by environmental and ethical performance.

Read more about University Of Brighton:  History, Campuses, Libraries, Notable Alumni, Staff and Associates, Educational Partnerships, Halls of Residence, Promoting Israeli-Arab Coexistence

Other articles related to "university of brighton, university":

University Of Brighton - Promoting Israeli-Arab Coexistence
... by the British Council, the Israel Sports Authority, the University of Brighton and the Sports University in Cologne, Germany and is funded by the European Union ... The Chelsea School of Sport, part of the University of Brighton, hosts the program ...
Meads - Educational Establishments - University of Brighton
... In 1947, a teacher training college opened in Meads, the first students being troops who had recently returned to civilian life ... The college was centred on Darley Road at two schools which had evacuated because of the war - Queenwood Ladies' College and Aldro ...

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