United States Army Branch Insignia

United States Army Branch Insignia

Branch insignia of the United States Army refers to military emblems that may be worn on the uniform of the United States Army to denote membership in a particular area of expertise and series of functional areas. Army branch insignia is similar to the line officer and staff corps officer devices of the United States Navy as well as to the Navy Enlisted rating badges.

Army branch insignia is separate from Army qualification badges in that qualification badges require completion of a training course or school, whereas branch insignia is issued to a service member upon assignment to a particular area of the Army.

Read more about United States Army Branch InsigniaHistory, How Worn, Branch of Service Insignia, Obsolete Insignia

Other articles related to "united states army branch insignia, insignia, branch insignia, branch":

United States Army Branch Insignia - Obsolete Insignia
... The following insignia are no longer used Branch Insignia Color Dates Description Bureau of Insular Affairs BI Dark blue 1902–1939 A bunch of seven arrows, points up, superimposed on a pair of ... {Consolidated into Field Artillery Branch 1950} Indian Scouts White and Scarlet Piping 1866–1947 No unique insignia authorized until 1890, at which point Scouts would wear silver crossed arrows and U.S.S ... collar insignia ...

Famous quotes containing the words united states, branch, united, states and/or army:

    The United States is the only great nation whose government is operated without a budget. The fact is to be the more striking when it is considered that budgets and budget procedures are the outgrowth of democratic doctrines and have an important part in developing the modern constitutional rights.... The constitutional purpose of a budget is to make government responsive to public opinion and responsible for its acts.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    In communist society, where nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity but each can become accomplished in any branch he wishes, society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, shepherd or critic.
    Karl Marx (1818–1883)

    I feel most at home in the United States, not because it is intrinsically a more interesting country, but because no one really belongs there any more than I do. We are all there together in its wholly excellent vacuum.
    Wyndham Lewis (1882–1957)

    The line that I am urging as today’s conventional wisdom is not a denial of consciousness. It is often called, with more reason, a repudiation of mind. It is indeed a repudiation of mind as a second substance, over and above body. It can be described less harshly as an identification of mind with some of the faculties, states, and activities of the body. Mental states and events are a special subclass of the states and events of the human or animal body.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    These semi-traitors [Union generals who were not hostile to slavery] must be watched.—Let us be careful who become army leaders in the reorganized army at the end of this Rebellion. The man who thinks that the perpetuity of slavery is essential to the existence of the Union, is unfit to be trusted. The deadliest enemy the Union has is slavery—in fact, its only enemy.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)