Tunnelling Companies

Some articles on tunnelling companies, tunnelling:

Tunnelling Companies Of The Royal Engineers - World War I Formation - Kitchener Responds
... agreed, and the three set out a structure for what were to be called tunnelling companies, rather than Norton-Griffiths' preference for 'moles' a symbol which many of ... the agreement of Collins and Fowke to form trial tunnelling companies ...
Battle Of Vimy Ridge - Prelude - Underground Operations
... On their arrival, the British Royal Engineer tunnelling companies became actively engaged in offensive mining against German miners, first stopping the German underground advance and ... In preparation for the assault, British tunnelling companies created extensive underground networks and fortifications ... In an effort to destroy some German surface fortifications before the assault, the British tunnelling companies secretly laid 13 large explosive charges directly under German positions ...
Tunnelling Companies Of The Royal Engineers - World War I Formation - Expansion
... The success of the Tunnelling Companies led to mining being made a separate branch of the new E-in-C's office, which was under Major-General S.R ... The second group of tunnelling companies were formed from Welsh miners from the 1st and 3rd Battalions of The Monmouthshire Regiment, who were attached to the 1st ... Twelve Tunnelling Companies were ultimately formed in 1915 and one more in 1916 ...
Tunnelling Companies Of The Royal Engineers
... Royal Engineer tunnelling companies were specialist units of the Corps of Royal Engineers within the British Army, formed to dig attacking tunnels under enemy lines during the First World War ... In February 1915, eight Tunnelling Companies were created and operational in Flanders from March 1915 ... The tactics and counter-tactics required deeper and deeper tunnelling, hence more time and more stable front lines were also required, so offensive and defensive military mining largely ceased ...

Famous quotes containing the word companies:

    In the U.S. for instance, the value of a homemaker’s productive work has been imputed mostly when she was maimed or killed and insurance companies and/or the courts had to calculate the amount to pay her family in damages. Even at that, the rates were mostly pink collar and the big number was attributed to the husband’s pain and suffering.
    Gloria Steinem (20th century)