Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine - The Worst Civil Engineering Disaster in US History

The Worst Civil Engineering Disaster in US History

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine was forced to close its doors for the first time since 1912 for one semester. This was the result of flooding of Tulane University's Health Science Center Campus in the central business district caused by levee failures after Hurricane Katrina . Tulane University of Public Health and Tropical Medicine received an outpouring of support from the Association of Schools of Public Health. The Association of Schools of Public Health acknowledge the following of the many examples of outstanding contributions.

The University of Oklahoma College of Public Health assigned a “buddy” to each guest student, who helped the student with the logistics involved in attending a new school, such as enrollment, navigating the campus, library use, etc.
The University of North Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health held a drive to collect needed supplies for their guest students.
The University of California at Berkeley School of Public Health, provided funding for students’ emergency needs.
Alumni from the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health donated gift cards for the displaced students to use for personal needs upon their arrival at the Rollins School.
The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services coordinated with faculty and students to find housing for displaced students.
The Columbia Mailman School of Public Health coordinated with faculty and students to find housing for displaced students.
The University of Texas School of Public Health (UT) was able to accommodate more than 60 students and faculty, and also provided space for Tulane administrators to regroup during the initial stages of crisis recovery.

All throughout the disaster and during recovery, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine faculty have studied and are studying the public health ramifications of the levee failures. Today, Tulane University and the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine remain deeply committed and involved in tangible efforts for a full recovery of New Orleans.

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