Traditional Genres of Mexican Music

Traditional Genres Of Mexican Music

The music of Mexico is very diverse and features a wide range of musical genres and performance styles. It has been influenced by a variety of cultures, most notably indigenous Mexican and European, since the Late Middle Ages. Many traditional Mexican songs are well-known worldwide, including Bésame Mucho (Kiss Me a Lot), Huapango, La Bamba (The Bamba), Solamente una vez (English version "You Belong to My Heart"), La Bikina (The Bikina), Cielito Lindo (Beautiful Sweetheart), Somos Novios (We Are Lovers; English version "It's Impossible"), El Rey (The King), María Bonita (Pretty María), México Lindo y Querido (Beautiful, Beloved Mexico). La Cucaracha (The Cockroach), although popularized during the Mexican Revolution, is a Mexican corrido.

Read more about Traditional Genres Of Mexican Music:  Mexican National Anthem, Traditional Folk, Other Music of Latin-american Roots, Classical, Table (traditional Music Ensembles), See Also

Other articles related to "traditional genres of mexican music, music, of mexican music, mexican":

Traditional Genres Of Mexican Music - See Also
... Latin American music portal Regional styles of Mexican music List of Mexican operas CategoryMexican composers ...

Famous quotes containing the words music, mexican and/or traditional:

    The dignity of art probably appears most eminently with music since it does not have any material that needs to be discounted. Music is all form and content and elevates and ennobles everything that it expresses.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    The germ of violence is laid bare in the child abuser by the sheer accident of his individual experience ... in a word, to a greater degree than we like to admit, we are all potential child abusers.
    F. Gonzalez-Crussi, Mexican professor of pathology, author. “Reflections on Child Abuse,” Notes of an Anatomist (1985)

    I come from a long line of male chauvinists in a very traditional family. To rebel against my background, I didn’t shoot dope—I married a working woman.
    Joe Bologna (20th century)