Torres Strait Island

Some articles on strait, island, straits, strait island, islands:

Kellett Strait
... The Kellett Strait (75°45′N 117°30′W / 75.750°N 117.500°W / 75.750 -117.500Coordinates 75°45′N 117°30′W / 75.750°N 117.500°W / 75.750 -117.500) is a natural waterway ... It separates Eglinton Island (to the west) and Melville Island (to the east) ... It opens into the McClure Strait to the south, and the Fitzwilliam Strait to the north ...
Well-known Straits
... more details on this topic, see list of straits ... Well-known straits in the world include Bab el Mandeb, connecting the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden ... Bass Strait, which lies between mainland Australia and Tasmania, and depending on definition, either connects the Indian Ocean with the Pacific Ocean, or connects the Southern Ocean to the Pacific Ocean ...
List Of Schools In Far North Queensland - State Schools - State Primary Schools
1916 Website Tagai State College - Badu Island Campus Badu Island Torres Strait Island 1905 Website Tagai State College - Dauan Island Campus Dauan Island Torres Strait Island ... Primary Campus Thursday Island Torres 1885 Website Tagai State College - Warraber Island Campus Warraber Island Torres Strait Island 1985 Website Tagai State College - Yam ...
Mentawai Strait
... Mentawai Strait separates Sumatra and Mentawai Islands, Indonesia ... Sea Savu Sea Seram Sea South China Sea Timor Sea Strait Alas Strait Alor Strait Badung Strait Bali Strait Bangka Strait Berhala Strait Dampier ...
Washington Strait
... Washington Strait (60°43′S 44°56′W / 60.717°S 44.933°W / -60.717 -44.933Coordinates 60°43′S 44°56′W / 60.717°S 44.933°W / -60.717 -44.933) is a passage 3 miles (4.8 ... incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Washington Strait" (content from the Geographic Names Information System) ...

Famous quotes containing the words island and/or strait:

    When the inhabitants of some sequestered island first descry the “big canoe” of the European rolling through the blue waters towards their shores, they rush down to the beach in crowds, and with open arms stand ready to embrace the strangers. Fatal embrace! They fold to their bosoms the vipers whose sting is destined to poison all their joys; and the instinctive feeling of love within their breasts is soon converted into the bitterest hate.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    We approached the Indian Island through the narrow strait called “Cook.” He said, “I ‘xpect we take in some water there, river so high,—never see it so high at this season. Very rough water there, but short; swamp steamboat once. Don’t paddle till I tell you, then you paddle right along.” It was a very short rapid. When we were in the midst of it he shouted “paddle,” and we shot through without taking in a drop.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)