Tom Veryzer - Detroit Tigers

Detroit Tigers

He started the 1974 season with the triple A Evansville Triplets, but was again brought up in August when the Tigers dealt Jim Northrup to the Montreal Expos. He had a career game against the Milwaukee Brewers on September 20. He hit a two run home run in the second inning to give the Tigers a 2-1 lead. After the Tigers surrendered the lead, he hit an RBI single in the seventh to tie the game back up. In all, he went three-for-four with a home run, two walks and four runs batted in.

The Tigers traded Brinkman at the 1974 Winter meetings, opening the door for Veryzer at short. On June 8, 1975, he doubled with two out in the ninth inning to break-up a no-hitter by Ken Holtzman. For the season, he batted .252 with five home runs and 48 RBIs (both career highs) while also hitting thirteen doubles to be named the shortstop on the Topps Rookie All-Star team. However, his 24 errors at short were fourth highest in the league.

Injuries limited Veryzer to 97 games in 1976. He returned healthy in 1977, but a horrible month of May (.093 batting average, 5 RBIs & 2 errors on the field) caused him to lose playing time to Mark Wagner and Chuck Scrivener. The three combined to bat .174 with three home runs and 33 RBIs while committing 26 errors. After the season, Veryzer was dealt to the Cleveland Indians for outfielder Charlie Spikes, opening the door for Alan Trammell to assumed the starting shortstop job in Detroit for the next sixteen years.

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