Time Discipline

In sociology and anthropology, time discipline is the general name given to social and economic rules, conventions, customs, and expectations governing the measurement of time, the social currency and awareness of time measurements, and people's expectations concerning the observance of these customs by others.

The concept of "time discipline" as a field of special attention in sociology and anthropology was pioneered by E. P. Thompson in Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism, published in 1967. Coming from a Marxist viewpoint, Thompson argued that observance of clock-time is a consequence of the European industrial revolution, and that neither industrial capitalism nor the creation of the modern state would have been possible without the imposition of synchronic forms of time and work discipline. The new clock time imposed by government and capitalist interests replaced earlier, collective perceptions of time that Thompson believed flowed from the collective wisdom of human societies. While in fact it appears likely that earlier views of time were imposed instead by religious and other social authorities prior to the industrial revolution, Thompson's work identified time discipline as an important concept for study within the social sciences.

Read more about Time Discipline:  Time Discipline and The Natural World, Time Discipline in Western Societies, Towards Time-keeping, Isochronous Time

Other articles related to "time discipline, time":

Time Discipline - Isochronous Time
... of the pendulum clock in 1656 by Christiaan Huygens, came isochronous time, with a fixed pace of 3600 seconds per hour ... Following the invention of the locomotive in 1830, time had to be synchronized across vast distances in order to organize the train schedules ... This eventually led to the development of time zones, and, thus, global isochronous time ...

Famous quotes containing the words discipline and/or time:

    Either you think—or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    There was an artist in the city of Kouroo who was disposed to strive after perfection. One day it came into his mind to make a staff. Having considered that in an imperfect work time is an ingredient, but into a perfect work time does not enter, he said to himself, It shall be perfect in all respects, though I should do nothing else in my life.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)