Theophrastus

Theophrastus (Greek: Θεόφραστος; c. 371 – c. 287 BC), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos, was the successor to Aristotle in the Peripatetic school. He came to Athens at a young age and initially studied in Plato's school. After Plato's death, he attached himself to Aristotle. Aristotle bequeathed to Theophrastus his writings and designated him as his successor at the Lyceum. Theophrastus presided over the Peripatetic school for thirty-six years, during which time the school flourished greatly. He is often considered the "father of botany" for his works on plants. After his death, the Athenians honoured him with a public funeral. His successor as head of the school was Strato of Lampsacus.

The interests of Theophrastus were wide ranging, extending from biology and physics to ethics and metaphysics. His two surviving botanical works, Enquiry into Plants and On the Causes of Plants, were an important influence on medieval science. There are also surviving works On Moral Characters, On Sensation, On Stones, and fragments on Physics and Metaphysics all written in Greek. In philosophy, he studied grammar and language and continued Aristotle's work on logic. He also regarded space as the mere arrangement and position of bodies, time as an accident of motion, and motion as a necessary consequence of all activity. In ethics, he regarded happiness as depending on external influences as well as on virtue and famously said that "life is ruled by fortune, not wisdom."

Read more about TheophrastusLife, Writings, Philosophy, The "portrait" of Theophrastus

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The "portrait" of Theophrastus
... The marble herm figure with the bearded head of philosopher type, bearing the explicit inscription, must be taken as purely conventional ... Unidentified portrait heads did not find a ready market in post-Renaissance Rome ...
John B. Mc Diarmid - Works
... McDiarmid’s published works include “Theophrastus on the Eternity of the World” ... “Theophrastus on the Presocratic Causes.” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 61 (1953) 85-156 ... “Theophrastus,” De Sensibus 66, Democritus’ Explanation of Salimity” ...
Aristotele - Thought - Biology and Medicine - Successor: Theophrastus
... Aristotle's successor at the Lyceum, Theophrastus, wrote a series of books on botany—the History of Plants—which survived as the most important contribution of antiquity to botany, even into the Middle ... Many of Theophrastus' names survive into modern times, such as carpos for fruit, and pericarpion for seed vessel ... Rather than focus on formal causes, as Aristotle did, Theophrastus suggested a mechanistic scheme, drawing analogies between natural and artificial processes, and relying on Aristotle's concept of the ...
Peripatetic School - Background
... did not become formally institutionalized until Theophrastus took it over, at which time there was private property associated with the school ... Among the members of the school in Aristotle's time were Theophrastus, Phanias of Eresus, Eudemus of Rhodes, Clytus of Miletus, Aristoxenus, and Dicaearchus ... After Aristotle's death in 322 BC, his colleague Theophrastus succeeded him as head of the school ...
Leontion
... to Cicero, Leontion is said to have published arguments criticizing the famous philosopher Theophrastus Leontium, that mere courtesan, who had the effrontery to write a ... at how a woman could possibly write against Theophrastus ...