The Night The Bed Fell

The Night the Bed Fell is a short story written by American author, James Thurber. The story is a brief account of an event that took place at his house in Columbus, Ohio. It appears as chapter one of My Life and Hard Times.

Read more about The Night The Bed Fell:  Structure

Other articles related to "the night the bed fell, night, bed":

The Night The Bed Fell - Structure
... The plot for "The Night The Bed Fell" starts with James Thurber's explaining his "interesting" family, including a crazy cousin that thinks he will die of suffocation during his sleep, and a grandfather that ... "The Night the Bed Fell" was copyrighted in 1999 ... The Night the Bed Fell One night when Thurber crashes down from his army cot, his mom comes to the immediate conclusion that the heavy headboard up in the attic ...
A Thurber Carnival - ACT 1 - The Night The Bed Fell
... The Night the Bed Fell consists of First Man sitting at the edge of the stage, telling the story of a particular night from his (Thurber's) childhood, when a collapsing bed provoked remarkable reactions from ...

Famous quotes containing the words fell, night and/or bed:

    What is it then to me, if impious War,
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    From a bed in this hotel Seargent S. Prentiss arose in the middle of the night and made a speech in defense of a bedbug that had bitten him. It was heard by a mock jury and judge, and the bedbug was formally acquitted.
    —Federal Writers’ Project Of The Wor, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and bad dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)