The Man Who Sold The Moon (short Story Collection)

The Man Who Sold The Moon (short Story Collection)

The Man Who Sold the Moon is the title of a 1950 collection of science fiction short stories by Robert A. Heinlein.

The stories, part of Heinlein's Future History series, appear in the first edition as follows:

  • Introduction by John W. Campbell, Jr.
  • Foreword by Robert A. Heinlein
  • '"Let There Be Light"' (1940; originally published in Super Science Stories)
  • "The Roads Must Roll" (1940; originally published in Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "The Man Who Sold the Moon" (1950; first appearance is in this collection)
  • "Requiem" (1940; originally published in Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Life-Line" (1939; originally published in Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Blowups Happen" (1940; originally published in Astounding Science Fiction)

Early paperback printings omitted "Life-Line" and "Blowups Happen", as well as Campbell's introduction.

Read more about The Man Who Sold The Moon (short Story Collection):  Reception

Other articles related to "man, sold, moon":

The Man Who Sold The Moon (short Story Collection) - Reception
... Boucher and McComas praised the 1950 edition as Heinlein at his superlative best. ... In his Books"column for F SF,Damon Knight selected The ManWho Soldthe Moonas one of the 10 best sf books of the 1950's ... Schuyler Miller said that Heinlein is a master of concealed technology ...

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