The Long Goodbye

The Long Goodbye may refer to:

Read more about The Long Goodbye:  Books, Films, Music, Television Episodes

Other articles related to "long, the long, the long goodbye":

Kondratiev Wave
... Kondratiev waves (also called supercycles, great surges, long waves, K-waves or the long economic cycle) are described as sinusoidal-like cycles in the modern capitalist world ... Unlike the short-term business cycle, the long wave of this theory is not accepted by current mainstream economics ...
The Long Goodbye - Television Episodes
... The Long Goodbye" (Beverly Hills, 90210) "The Long Goodbye" (Casualty) "The Long Goodbye" (Dallas) "The Long Goodbye" (Dawson's Creek) "The Long Goodbye" (Duet ...
ß
... consonant letter that evolved as a ligature of "long s and z" (ſz) and "long s over round s" (ſs) ... In standard spelling, it is only used after long vowels and diphthongs, while ss is written after short vowels ... Even though long s (ſ) has otherwise disappeared from German orthography, ß is still used as a ligature and is replaced by 'SS' or 'SZ' in capitalized ...
Red Wolf - Physiology - Species Description
... Coat long, coarse mostly brown and buff colored on the upper part of the body with some black along the backs ... Muzzle long nose pad wide and black ears rufous legs long tail long, bushy, black tipped ...
Unintended Consequences - Causes
... Immediate interest, which may override long-term interests Basic values may require or prohibit certain actions even if the long-term result might be ...

Famous quotes containing the words goodbye and/or long:

    The colicky baby who becomes calm, the quiet infant who throws temper tantrums at two, the wild child at four who becomes serious and studious at six all seem to surprise their parents. It is difficult to let go of one’s image of a child, say goodbye to the child a parent knows, and get accustomed to this slightly new child inhabiting the known child’s body.
    Ellen Galinsky (20th century)

    Mark the babe
    Not long accustomed to this breathing world;
    One that hath barely learned to shape a smile,
    Though yet irrational of soul, to grasp
    With tiny finger—to let fall a tear;
    And, as the heavy cloud of sleep dissolves,
    To stretch his limbs, bemocking, as might seem,
    The outward functions of intelligent man.
    William Wordsworth (1770–1850)