The Jane Austen Book Club (film)

The Jane Austen Book Club (film)

The Jane Austen Book Club is a 2007 American romantic drama film written and directed by Robin Swicord. The screenplay, adapted from the 2004 novel of the same name by Karen Joy Fowler, focuses on a book club formed specifically to discuss the six novels written by Jane Austen. As they delve into Austen's literature, the club members find themselves dealing with life experiences that parallel the themes of the books they are reading.

Read more about The Jane Austen Book Club (film):  Plot, Production, Cast, Critical Reception

Other articles related to "film, jane":

The Jane Austen Book Club (film) - Critical Reception
... On the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, 69% of critics gave the filmpositive reviews, based on 86 reviews, while on Metacritic, the filmhas an average score of 61 out of 100, based ... Stephen Holden of the New York Times said the film"is such a well-acted, literate adaptation of Karen Joy Fowler's 2004 best seller that your impulse is to ... Like the other movies and television projects in a JaneAusten boom that continues to gather momentum, it is an entertaining, carefully assembled piece of clockwork that imposes order on ever more complicated ...

Famous quotes containing the words club, jane, austen and/or book:

    The barriers of conventionality have been raised so high, and so strangely cemented by long existence, that the only hope of overthrowing them exists in the union of numbers linked together by common opinion and effort ... the united watchword of thousands would strike at the foundation of the false system and annihilate it.
    Mme. Ellen Louise Demorest 1824–1898, U.S. women’s magazine editor and woman’s club movement pioneer. Demorest’s Illustrated Monthly and Mirror of Fashions, p. 203 (January 1870)

    Mistress, there are portents abroad of magic and might,
    And things that are yet to be done. Open the door!
    —Elizabeth Jane Coatsworth (b. 1893)

    It is indolence ... indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish; read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife. His curate does all the work and the business of his own life is to dine.
    —Jane Austen (1775–1817)

    A good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
    John Milton (1608–1674)