The Greatest Show On Earth: The Evidence For Evolution

The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution is a 2009 book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, which was released on 3 September 2009 in the UK and on 22 September 2009 in the U.S. It sets out the evidence for biological evolution, and is Dawkins's 10th book, following his bestselling critique of religion The God Delusion (2006) and The Ancestor's Tale (2004), which traced human ancestry back to the dawn of life.

The book is published in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth nations by Transworld, and in the United States by Free Press. In its first week of release, it topped The Sunday Times' Bestseller list, with more than twice the sales of its nearest competitor. An audiobook version has also been released, read by Dawkins and his wife Lalla Ward.

Read more about The Greatest Show On Earth: The Evidence For Evolution:  Background, Synopsis, Critical Reception, See Also

Other articles related to "evolution, evidence":

The Greatest Show On Earth: The Evidence For Evolution - See Also
... Creation-evolution controversy E ... coli long-term evolution experiment – discussed in detail in chapter 5 Great chain of being Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) – example of evolution observed Domesticated silver fox Evidence of common descent ...

Famous quotes containing the words evolution, evidence, greatest and/or show:

    The more specific idea of evolution now reached is—a change from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity, accompanying the dissipation of motion and integration of matter.
    Herbert Spencer (1820–1903)

    If you are of the opinion that the contemplation of suicide is sufficient evidence of a poetic nature, do not forget that actions speak louder than words.
    Fran Lebowitz (b. 1951)

    Money is a singular thing. It ranks with love as man’s greatest source of joy. And with death as his greatest source of anxiety. Over all history it has oppressed nearly all people in one of two ways: either it has been abundant and very unreliable, or reliable and very scarce.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)

    He could walk, or rather turn about in his little garden, and feel more solid happiness from the flourishing of a cabbage or the growing of a turnip than was ever received from the most ostentatious show the vanity of man could possibly invent. He could delight himself with thinking, “Here will I set such a root, because my Camilla likes it; here, such another, because it is my little David’s favorite.”
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)