The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments

The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments was a children's chemistry book written in the 1960s by Robert Brent and illustrated by Harry Lazarus and published by Western Publishing in their Golden Books series. OCLC lists only 126 copies of this book in libraries worldwide.

The book was a source of inspiration to David Hahn, nicknamed "the Radioactive Boy Scout" by the media, who tried to collect a sample of every chemical element and also built a model nuclear reactor, which led to the involvement of the authorities.

Read more about The Golden Book Of Chemistry Experiments:  Printing History, Collector's Item

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The Golden Book Of Chemistry Experiments - Collector's Item
... Copies of this book often sell for prices between $100 to over $700 (USD), or higher, depending on condition ...

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