The Cramps - Style

Style

Their music is mostly in rockabilly form, played at varying tempos, with a minimal drumkit. An integral part of the early Cramps sound is dual guitars, without a bassist. The focus of their songs' lyrical content and their image is camp humor, and retro horror/sci-fi b-movie iconography.

Their sound was heavily influenced by early rockabilly, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll like Link Wray and Hasil Adkins, 1960s surf music acts such as The Ventures and Dick Dale, 1960s garage rock artists like The Standells, The Gants, The Trashmen, The Green Fuz and The Sonics, as well as the post-glam/early punk scene from which they emerged. They also were influenced to a degree by the Ramones and Screamin' Jay Hawkins, who was an influence for their style of theatrical horror-blues.

In turn, The Cramps have influenced countless subsequent bands in the garage, punk and rockabilly revival subgenres, and helped create the psychobilly genre. "Psychobilly" was a term coined1 by The Cramps, although Lux Interior maintained that the term did not describe their own style.

Read more about this topic:  The Cramps

Other articles related to "style":

Jack Johnson (boxer) - Boxing Style
... Johnson's boxing style was very distinctive ... Johnson's style was very effective, but it was criticized in the press as being cowardly and devious ...
Buddhist Cuisine
... place will be influenced by the native style of food there ... of "Buddhist food" as a distinct sub-style of cuisine is tied to monasteries, where one member of the community would have the duty of being the head cook and supplying meals ... A more recent version, more Chinese in style, is prepared by the Ōbaku school of zen, and known as fucha ryōri (普茶料理?) this is served at the head temple of Manpuku-ji ...
Yvon Deschamps - Style
... In the beginning, Yvon Deschamps' never-named "character" was distinguished by his spectacular naïvete, which served as a vehicle for Deschamps to tackle delicate subjects such as racism ... In Nigger Black, for instance, the character recalled boyhood surprise upon learning that "Nègres" were no more nor less than human beings like him, neither better nor worse Us, we had some on our street they lived in the same houses we did, went to the same schools ...
J. M. W. Turner - Art - Style
... His distinctive style of painting, in which he used watercolour technique with oil paints, created lightness, fluency, and ephemeral atmospheric effects ... A prime example of his mature style can be seen in Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway, where the objects are barely recognizable ... Physician of Bedlam, was a significant influence on Turner's style ...
Yakshagana - Variations - Badagutittu
... The Badagutittu style, as its name indicates, is prevalent in Northern parts of South Canara, that is, from Padubidri to Byndoor and North Kanara District ... The Badagutittu style was popularized by Shivram Karanth's Yakshagana Mandira at Saligrama village in Dakshina Kannada as a shorter, more modern form of Yakshagana ... Yakshagana Mandali is an exponent of this style of Yakshagana ...

Famous quotes containing the word style:

    I would observe to you that what is called style in writing or speaking is formed very early in life while the imagination is warm, and impressions are permanent.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    Sometimes among our more sophisticated, self-styled intellectuals—and I say self-styled advisedly; the real intellectual I am not sure would ever feel this way—some of them are more concerned with appearance than they are with achievement. They are more concerned with style then they are with mortar, brick and concrete. They are more concerned with trivia and the superficial than they are with the things that have really built America.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    I am so tired of taking to others
    translating my life for the deaf, the blind,
    the “I really want to know what your life is like without giving up any of my privileges
    to live it” white women
    the “I want to live my white life with Third World women’s style and keep my skin
    class privileges” dykes
    Lorraine Bethel, African American lesbian feminist poet. “What Chou Mean We, White Girl?” Lines 49-54 (1979)