Tha Carter II

Tha Carter II is the fifth studio album by American rapper Lil Wayne, released on December 6, 2005, by Cash Money, Young Money, and Universal. The album serves as a sequel to his fourth album Tha Carter (2004). Its music incorporates southern hip hop styles. As executive producers, Birdman and Ronald "Slim" Williams enlisted a variety of collaborators, including The Runners, Robin Thicke, and The Heatmakerz.

Upon its release, Tha Carter II received generally favorable reviews from music critics, who complimented its musical progression from his previous albums. The album peaked at number two on the U.S. Billboard 200 for first week sales of over 254,000 copies.

Read more about Tha Carter IIReception, Track Listing, Personnel

Other articles related to "tha carter ii, tha carter":

Weezyaveli - Career - 2003–06: Tha Carter, Tha Carter II, and Like Father, Like Son
... In the summer of 2004, Wayne's album Tha Carter was released, marking what critics considered advancement in his rapping style and lyrical themes ... Tha Carter gained Wayne significant recognition, selling 878,000 copies in the United States, while the single "Go DJ" became a Top 5 Hit on the R B/Hip-Hop ... After the release of Tha Carter, Lil Wayne was featured in Destiny's Child's single "Soldier" with T.I ...
Lil Wayne - Music Career - 2000–05: Lights Out, 500 Degreez, Tha Carter and Tha Carter II
... In the summer of 2004, Wayne's album Tha Carter was released, marking what critics considered advancement in his rapping style and lyrical themes ... Tha Carter gained Wayne significant recognition, selling 878,000 copies in the United States, while the single "Go DJ" became a Top 5 Hit on the R B/Hip-Hop chart ... After the release of Tha Carter, Lil Wayne was featured in Destiny's Child's single "Soldier" with T.I ...

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