Texas Tech University System

The Texas Tech University System consists of a central administration and three universities, Texas Tech University, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, and Angelo State University. The System is headquartered in the Administration Building on the Texas Tech University campus in Lubbock, Texas. While still much younger than its counterparts, the Texas Tech University System has emerged as one of the top university systems in the state.

Operating on more than 15 campuses and academic sites, the Texas Tech University System provides educational programs, research, health care and community outreach and support across the state of Texas and the South Plains.

With an annual operating budget of $1.4 billion, the Texas Tech University System educates approximately 43,500 students and employs more than 18,000 faculty and staff. Collectively, the System conducted more than $202 million in research in 2011.

The System’s national endowment ranking stands at No. 86 in the country, and financial aid awarded to students system-wide increased to $420.3 million in 2011. Additionally, the System raised more than $183 million in 2011, which was the fifth consecutive year to raise more than $100 million. The System also contributed more than $2.6 billion in economic impact to the region in 2011.

Read more about Texas Tech University SystemHistory, Campuses

Other articles related to "texas tech university system, university, texas tech university, texas":

List Of Colleges And Universities In Texas - Public Universities - Texas Tech University System
... Endowment Research Expenditures (FY 2011) Carnegie Classification Angelo State University 1928 7,084 268 $103 million Texas Tech University 1923 32,327 1839 $434 ...
Texas Tech University System - Campuses - Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
... Abilene, Texas Amarillo, Texas Dallas, Texas El Paso, Texas Lubbock, Texas Permian Basin (Odessa and Midland, Texas) ...

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