System Theory

Some articles on system, system theory, theory, systems:

Talcott Parsons - Biography - Subscriber To System-theory, Early 1950s
... Parsons was an early subscriber to system-theory ... His interest in system-theory had been further stimulated through his contract with L.J ... Parsons called the concept of "system" for an indispensable master concept in the work of building theoretical paradigms for the social sciences ...
LTI System Theory
... Linear time-invariant system theory, commonly known as LTI system theory, comes from applied mathematics and has direct applications in NMR spectroscopy, seismology, circuits, signal processing, control theory ... It investigates the response of a linear and time-invariant system to an arbitrary input signal ... Trajectories of these systems are commonly measured and tracked as they move through time (e.g ...
Systems Theory In Anthropology
... Systems Theory in Anthropology is an interdisciplinary, non-representative, non-referential, and non-Cartesian approach that brings together natural ... The basic idea of a system theory in social science is to solve the classical problem of duality mind-body, subject-object, form-content, signifier-signified, and structure-agency ... System theory, therefore, suggests that instead of creating closed categories into binaries (subject-object) the system should stay open so as to allow free flow of process and interactions ...

Famous quotes containing the words theory and/or system:

    The theory [before the twentieth century] ... was that all the jobs in the world belonged by right to men, and that only men were by nature entitled to wages. If a woman earned money, outside domestic service, it was because some misfortune had deprived her of masculine protection.
    Rheta Childe Dorr (1866–1948)

    A religion so cheerless, a philosophy so sorrowful, could never have succeeded with the masses of mankind if presented only as a system of metaphysics. Buddhism owed its success to its catholic spirit and its beautiful morality.
    W. Winwood Reade (1838–1875)