Syracuse University – Comstock Tract Buildings

Syracuse University – Comstock Tract Buildings

Coordinates: 43°02′16″N 76°08′02″W / 43.03766198°N 76.13400936°W / 43.03766198; -76.13400936

The Comstock Tract Buildings of Syracuse University were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Included in the registration are 15 buildings, all located on the original Syracuse University campus, a tract of land donated by George Comstock. The buildings include what has been known as the "Old Row". The 15 buildings are:

  • Archbold Gymnasium (1907)
  • Bowne Hall (1907)
  • Carnegie Library (1907)
  • Crouse College (1884) (separately listed NRHP 7/30/1974)
  • Hendricks Memorial Chapel (1933)
  • Hall of Languages (1873) (separately listed NRHP 9/20/1973)
  • Holden Observatory (1887)
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship (1937)
  • Lyman C. Smith Hall (1902)
  • Lyman Hall of Natural History (1907)
  • Machinery Hall (1907)
  • Sims Hall (1907)
  • Slocum Hall (1919)
  • Steele Hall (1898)
  • Tolley Administration Building (1889)

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