Symbols of South Carolina

Symbols Of South Carolina

The state of South Carolina has many official state symbols, holidays and designations and they have been selected to represent the history, resources, and possibilities of the state. The palmetto and crescent moon of the state flag is South Carolina's best-known symbol. It is seen on shirts and bumperstickers and is often adapted throughout the state to show support for collegiate teams or interest in particular sports activities.

Read more about Symbols Of South CarolinaSymbols of Sovereignty, List of State Symbols, List of State Holidays and Observances, List of Additional State Designations, See Also

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Symbols Of South Carolina - See Also
... Index of South Carolina-related articles Lists of United States state insignia State of South Carolina ...

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    Many older wealthy families have learned to instill a sense of public service in their offspring. But newly affluent middle-class parents have not acquired this skill. We are using our children as symbols of leisure-class standing without building in safeguards against an overweening sense of entitlement—a sense of entitlement that may incline some young people more toward the good life than toward the hard work that, for most of us, makes the good life possible.
    David Elkind (20th century)

    Poetry presents indivisible wholes of human consciousness, modified and ordered by the stringent requirements of form. Prose, aiming at a definite and concrete goal, generally suppresses everything inessential to its purpose; poetry, existing only to exhibit itself as an aesthetic object, aims only at completeness and perfection of form.
    Richard Harter Fogle, U.S. critic, educator. The Imagery of Keats and Shelley, ch. 1, University of North Carolina Press (1949)

    And into the gulf between cantankerous reality and the male ideal of shaping your world, sail the innocent children. They are right there in front of us—wild, irresponsible symbols of everything else we can’t control.
    Hugh O’Neill (20th century)

    Whenever I’m asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one. To be able to recognize a freak, you have to have some conception of the whole man, and in the South the general conception of man is still, in the main, theological.
    Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964)