Swimming Horses

"Swimming Horses" is a song written and recorded by British rock band Siouxsie and the Banshees. It was co-produced with Mike Hedges and was released as the first single from the band's sixth studio album Hyæna.

The song is based on a piano-driven melody. "Swimming Horses" peaked at number twenty-eight in the UK Singles Chart.

The lyrics are about a strong issue as Siouxsie explained it :

This is based on a programme I saw about a female version of Amnesty, called ‘Les Sentinelles’. They rescue women who are trapped in certain religious climates in the Middle East, religions that view any kind of pre-marital sexual aspersion as punishable by death - either by the hand of the eldest brother in the family, or by public stoning. And there was this instance of a woman whose daughter had developed a tumour, and, of course, gossip abounded that she was pregnant. The doctor who removed the tumour allowed her to take it back to the village to prove that, no, it wasn’t a baby - but they wouldn’t believe her. The woman knew her daughter would have to be stoned to death so she poisoned her, out of kindness, to save her from a worse fate. Now this organisation has all these escape routes for women like her, mainly through the elder brother who pretends to have killed them. But once they’ve been saved, they can never go back. So the song starts, Kinder than with poison... I also used the imagery of, He gives birth to swimming horses, from the fact that male sea horses give birth to the children, so they’re the only species that have a maternal feel for the young. It was, I suppose, an abstract way of linking it all together without being sensationalist. I remember just being really moved by that programme, and wanting to get the sorrow out of me.

Famous quotes containing the words horses and/or swimming:

    mouth to mouth, the covers
    pulled over our shoulders
    we drowse as horses drowse afield,
    in accord; though the fall cold
    surrounds our warm bed, and though
    by day we are singular and often lonely.
    Denise Levertov (b. 1923)

    The swimming hole is still in use. It has the same mudbank. It is still impossible to dress without carrying mud home in one’s inner garments. As an engineer I could devise improvements for that swimming hole. But I doubt if the decrease in mother’s grief at the homecoming of muddy boys would compensate the inherent joys of getting muddy.
    Herbert Hoover (1874–1964)