Sublime (band) - Musical Style and Influences

Musical Style and Influences

Sublime was one of the most popular bands of the third wave of ska, specifically characterized as ska punk. Their genre-blending mash-up style incorporated elements of dub, reggae, first-wave and second-wave ska, punk rock, hardcore punk, rockabilly, improvised dancehall, hip hop, psychedelic rock and acoustic rock, which they developed through their live shows.

Bob Marley and associated Jamaican reggae acts The Wailers, and Peter Tosh feature prominently in Sublime's songs, as do other Jamaican reggae and dancehall acts such as Born Jamericans, Toots & the Maytals, The Melodians, Wayne Smith, Tenor Saw, Frankie Paul, The Wailing Souls, Barrington Levy, Half Pint and Yellowman. The band additionally covered "Smoke Two Joints" originally by Oregon-based reggae group The Toyes.

Sublime was also heavily influenced by the 1980s and 1990s hip-hop and rap scene of Los Angeles and New York City, alluding to or borrowing from such acts as N.W.A and Eazy-E (who died 14 months before Nowell), the Beastie Boys, Just-Ice, Public Enemy and Flavor Flav, KRS-One, Doug E. Fresh, Too $hort, Mobb Deep, as well as the Philadelphia-based rapper Steady B and Texas hip-hop The Geto Boys.

The southern California metal, surf rock and punk scene influencing Sublime includes Big Drill Car (who were thanked in the first two albums), The Ziggens, Minutemen, The Descendents, Bad Religion, The Bel-Airs, Butthole Surfers, Secret Hate, as well as fellow fusion band Fishbone. Sublime was also influenced by Washington, DC hardcore acts such as Minor Threat, Fugazi (who were also thanked in the first album) and Bad Brains. The band also referenced popular California bands like Grateful Dead, The Doors, and Red Hot Chili Peppers, as well as Swedish band ABBA.

A few references are made to funk, R&B, and soul bands such as James Brown, the Ohio Players, Jimi Hendrix, Frank Zappa, Aswad, as well as a smattering of Irish, Scottish and English bands like Boomtown Rats, The Specials, and Primal Scream.

Sublime's music was highlighted by bass-driven grooves, reggae rhythms, elaborately-cadenced rhyme schemes and transitions between paces and styles throughout a given song, sometimes alternating between thrash punk, ska and reggae within the same song (see "Seed"). Their music often contains psychedelic, harmonic minor-based or bluesy guitar solos, rhythmically-improvised bass solos or dub-lines, turntable scratching and rolling drum transitions and heavy bass lines. They are known for being one of the first and most influential reggae fusion musicians.

Read more about this topic:  Sublime (band)

Other articles related to "musical style and influences, influences, musical style":

Sunny Day Sets Fire - Musical Style and Influences
... The band cited their influences as Wizard Of Oz, Gummo, The Beatles and The Velvet Underground ...
List Of Drake & Josh Characters - Drake's Band - Musical Style and Influences
... Even though their main musical style is never revealed in the show, it is presumed that their main genres are power pop (as evidenced in the song "The Girl Next Door"), alternative rock (as evidenced ... Possible influences for the band are Sparks (mentioned frequently in the series), Zero Gravity, and Aerosmith (the Just Push Play album sleeve is seen frequently in ...

Famous quotes containing the words influences, musical and/or style:

    Do not seek anxiously to be developed, to subject yourself to many influences to be played on; it is all dissipation.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Fifty million Frenchmen can’t be wrong.
    —Anonymous. Popular saying.

    Dating from World War I—when it was used by U.S. soldiers—or before, the saying was associated with nightclub hostess Texas Quinan in the 1920s. It was the title of a song recorded by Sophie Tucker in 1927, and of a Cole Porter musical in 1929.

    The history of all Magazines shows plainly that those which have attained celebrity were indebted for it to articles similar in natureto Berenice—although, I grant you, far superior in style and execution. I say similar in nature. You ask me in what does this nature consist? In the ludicrous heightened into the grotesque: the fearful coloured into the horrible: the witty exaggerated into the burlesque: the singular wrought out into the strange and mystical.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)