Subduction

In geology, subduction is the process that takes place at convergent boundaries by which one tectonic plate moves under another tectonic plate and sinks into the mantle as the plates converge. Regions where this process occurs are known as subduction zones. Rates of subduction are typically measured in centimeters per year, with the average rate of convergence being approximately 2 to 8 cm per year.

Plates include both oceanic crust and continental crust. Stable subduction zones involve the oceanic crust of one plate sliding beneath the continental crust or oceanic crust of another plate. That is, the subducted crust is always oceanic while the overriding crust may or may not be oceanic. Subduction zones are often noted for their high rates of volcanism, earthquakes, and mountain building.

Orogenesis, or mountain-building, occurs when large pieces of material on the subducting plate (such as island arcs) are pressed into the overriding plate. These areas are subject to many earthquakes, which are caused by the interactions between the subducting slab and the mantle, the volcanoes, and (when applicable) the mountain-building related to island arc collisions.

Read more about SubductionGeneral Description, Theory On Origin, Subduction Angle, Importance

Other articles related to "subduction":

Silverthrone Caldera - Geology - Origins
... However, it may be a product of the Cascadia subduction zone because andesite, basaltic andesite, dacite and rhyolite can be found at the volcano and elsewhere ... are the current plate configuration and rate of subduction but Silverthrone's chemistry indicates that Silverthrone is subduction related ... The Cascadia subduction zone is a long convergent plate boundary that separates the Juan de Fuca, Explorer, Gorda and North American Plates ...
Subduction - Importance
... Subduction zones are important for several reasons Subduction Zone Physics Sinking of the oceanic lithosphere (sediments + crust + mantle), by contrast of density between the cold and old ... Subduction Zone Chemistry The subducted sediments and crust dehydrate and release water-rich (aqueous) fluids into the overlying mantle, causing mantle melting and fractionation of elements between ... Subduction zones drag down subducted oceanic sediments, oceanic crust, and mantle lithosphere that interact with the hot asthenospheric mantle from the overriding plate to ...
Cascade Volcanoes - Cascadia Subduction Zone
... The Cascade Volcanoes were formed by the subduction of the Juan de Fuca, Explorer and the Gorda Plate (remnants of the much larger Farallon Plate) under the North American Plate along ... at a relative rate of over 0.4 inches (10 mm) per year at a somewhat oblique angle to the subduction zone ... Because of the very large fault area, the Cascadia subduction zone can produce very large earthquakes, magnitude 9.0 or greater, if rupture occurred over its whole area ...
Laramide
... Most hypotheses propose that the angle of subduction became shallow, and as a consequence, no magmatism occurred in the central west of the continent, and the underlying oceanic lithosphere actually caused drag on the ... One cause for shallow subduction may have been an increased rate of plate convergence ... Another proposed cause was subduction of thickened oceanic crust ...
Carnegie Ridge - Subduction
... The onset of subduction of the Carnegie Ridge beneath the South American Plate has been dated variously from about mid-Miocene (15 Ma) to about Pleistocene (2 Ma) ...