Students For A Democratic Society

Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was a student activist movement in the United States that was one of the main representations of the New Left. The organization developed and expanded rapidly in the mid-1960s before dissolving at its last convention in 1969. SDS has been an important influence on student organizing in the decades since its collapse. Participatory democracy, direct action, radicalism, student power, shoestring budgets, and its organizational structure are all present in varying degrees in current American student activist groups. Though various organizations have been formed in subsequent years as proposed national networks for left-wing student organizing, none has approached the scale of SDS, and most have lasted a few years at best.

A new incarnation of SDS was founded in 2006.

Read more about Students For A Democratic Society:  Origins, Early Years: 1962–1965, From Protest To Resistance: 1965–1968, Climax and Split: 1968–1969, SDS-WSA: 1969 To 1974 and Beyond, The New SDS: 2006 and Later

Other articles related to "students for a democratic society, students, student, society":

League For Industrial Democracy - Student Affiliates - Students For A Democratic Society
... On January 1, 1960 the group changed its name to the Students for a Democratic Society and began to take a more radical direction ... with Michael Harrington and Tom Kahn over the Port Huron Statement's identification with students raised in some "degree of comfort" and its criticism of labor unions and working-class culture (which was viewed as ...
Mark D. Naison - Students For A Democratic Society
... was participating in anti-war activities sponsored by SDS (Students for a Democratic Society) ... This time it was organized by the Columbia chapter of SDS and SAS (Student African-American Society) ...

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    —D.H. (David Herbert)