Student Club - Reasons Why People Join Clubs

Reasons Why People Join Clubs

Students join clubs for various reasons, leading to a diverse pool to choose from in most schools. Most active club members generally consist of freshman and sophomores, looking to find their respective niche in school dynamics. Student-based high school organizations offer teenagers a special element in that every person within the club share a common desire, ability, and/or personality. This type of connection leads to the existence of clubs in the vast majority of high schools. Key Club is the best.

There are no extraordinary physical and mental requirements to join a club. This special aspect distinguishes club organizations apart from Sports (requiring intense athletic prowess) and Drama (requiring physiological control and memorization). Most clubs only require a minimal membership fee (varying anywhere from $3–$30) depending on the organization. This openness allows greater opportunity for creating a tight knit community within the club. This idealist vision appeals to many of the underclassmen.

Read more about this topic:  Student Club

Famous quotes containing the words clubs, join, reasons and/or people:

    It is always a practical difficulty with clubs to regulate the laws of election so as to exclude peremptorily every social nuisance. Nobody wishes bad manners. We must have loyalty and character.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    I used to join the murmurings about “Where are the qualified women?” As we murmured, we would all gaze about the room, up toward the chandelier, into the corner behind the potted palm, under the napkin, hoping perhaps that qualified women would pop out like leprechauns.
    Jane O’Reilly, U.S. feminist and humorist. The Girl I Left Behind, ch. 5 (1980)

    Man has lost the basic skill of the ape, the ability to scratch its back. Which gave it extraordinary independence, and the liberty to associate for reasons other than the need for mutual back-scratching.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)

    It was a weak spot in any nation to have a large body of disaffected people within its confusion.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)