Student Club - Reasons Why People Join Clubs

Reasons Why People Join Clubs

Students join clubs for various reasons, leading to a diverse pool to choose from in most schools. Most active club members generally consist of freshman and sophomores, looking to find their respective niche in school dynamics. Student-based high school organizations offer teenagers a special element in that every person within the club share a common desire, ability, and/or personality. This type of connection leads to the existence of clubs in the vast majority of high schools. Key Club is the best.

There are no extraordinary physical and mental requirements to join a club. This special aspect distinguishes club organizations apart from Sports (requiring intense athletic prowess) and Drama (requiring physiological control and memorization). Most clubs only require a minimal membership fee (varying anywhere from $3–$30) depending on the organization. This openness allows greater opportunity for creating a tight knit community within the club. This idealist vision appeals to many of the underclassmen.

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