Still I Rise: A Cartoon History of African Americans

Still I Rise: A Cartoon History Of African Americans

Still I Rise: A Cartoon History of African Americans is a book by co-authored by Roland Owen Laird Jr. and Taneshia Nash Laird, and illustrated by Elihu “Adolfo” Bey. First published in September 1997, it was the first book to tell the vivid history of African Americans in one 200+ page cartoon narrative. Still I Rise covers the history of black people in America between the time periods of 1618, when the first skilled African craftspeople and farmers were brought over as indentured servants, to the Million Man March of 1995.

Cartoonist Bey and the Lairds analyze such topics as militancy, separatism, integration, focusing on leaders such as Harriet Tubman, Fredrick Douglass, and Martin Luther King. The historically accurate book shows how Black Americans have persevered despite overwhelming odds.

Read more about Still I Rise: A Cartoon History Of African AmericansAuthors’ and Illustrator Background, Plot Summary, Reviews

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Still I Rise: A Cartoon History Of African Americans - Reviews
... Still I Rise has received nothing but great reviews ... used the book as a fun and different way to teach the history of African Americans to young people ... Author Russell Banks (Rule of the Bone) says on the back of Still I Rise, "It's not just the history of African-Americans it's the African-American history of “all” Americans." Other well-known media sources ...

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