Stereopsis

Stereopsis (from stereo- meaning "solid" or "three-dimensional", and opsis meaning appearance or sight) is the impression of depth that is perceived when a scene is viewed with both eyes by someone with normal binocular vision. Binocular viewing of a scene creates two slightly different images of the scene in the two eyes due to the eyes' different positions on the head. These differences, referred to as binocular disparity, provide information that the brain can use to calculate depth in the visual scene, providing a major means of depth perception. The term stereopsis is often used as shorthand for 'binocular vision', 'binocular depth perception' or 'stereoscopic depth perception', though strictly speaking, the impression of depth associated with stereopsis can also be obtained under other conditions, such as when an observer views a scene with only one eye while moving. Observer motion creates differences in the single retinal image over time similar to binocular disparity; this is referred to as motion parallax. Importantly, stereopsis is not usually present when viewing a scene with one eye, when viewing a picture of a scene with both eyes, or when someone with abnormal binocular vision (strabismus) views a scene with both eyes. This is despite the fact that in all these three cases humans can still perceive depth relations.

Read more about Stereopsis:  History of Stereopsis, Popular Culture, Geometrical Basis For Stereopsis, Computer Stereo Vision, Computer Stereo Display, Stereopsis Tests, Stereopsis Deficiency and Treatment

Other articles related to "stereopsis":

Depth Perception - Binocular Cues
... Stereopsis or retinal (binocular) disparity - Animals that have their eyes placed frontally can also use information derived from the different projection of objects onto each retina to judge depth ... It is stereopsis that tricks people into thinking they perceive depth when viewing Magic Eyes, Autostereograms, 3-D movies and stereoscopic photos ... By virtue of stereopsis the two eye balls focus on the same object ...
Cyclopean Stimuli
... He thought that stereopsis might help to discover hidden objects, this might be useful to find camouflaged objects ... that Julesz showed using random dot stereograms (RDSs) that disparity is sufficient for stereopsis, where Charles Wheatstone had only shown that binocular disparity was necessary ...
Stereopsis Deficiency and Treatment
... Deficiency in stereopsis can be complete (then called stereoblindness) or more or less impaired ... one of the treatments for people lacking in stereopsis ...
Binocular Vision - Stereopsis
... Stereopsis is an ability to make fine depth discriminations from parallax provided by the two eye's different positions on the head ... There are two sorts quantitative stereopsis, in which the depth seen is very similar to the actual depth of the object being judged, and qualitative stereopsis, in which the depth is correctly nearer or ... Quantitative stereopsis holds for small distances from the fixation plane (approximately within Panum's fusional area) qualitative stereopsis holds for larger distances from the fixation plane (outside of ...
Early Theories of Binocular Rivalry
... Wheatsone also discovered binocular stereopsis, the perception of depth arising from the lateral placement of the eyes ... Wheatstone was able to prove that stereopsis depended on the different horizontal positions (the horizontal disparity) of points in the images viewed by each eye by creating the ... Such stereopsis is impossible unless information is being combined from each eye ...