Station Model

A station model is a symbolic illustration showing the weatheroccurring at a given reporting station. Meteorologists created the station model to plot a number of weather elements in a small space on weather maps. Maps filled with dense station-model plots can be difficult to read, but they allow meteorologists, pilots, and mariners to see important weather patterns.

A computer draws a station model for each observation location. The station model is primarily used on surface-weather maps, but can also be used to show the weather aloft. A completed station-model map allows users to analyze patterns in air pressure, temperature, wind, cloud cover, and precipitation.

Station model plots use an internationally-accepted coding convention that has changed little since August 1, 1941. Elements in the plot show the key weather elements, including temperature, dew point, wind, cloud cover, air pressure, pressure tendency, and precipitation.

Read more about Station ModelMeasurement Location and Units, Plotted Winds, Cloud Cover, Cloud Types, Present Weather and Visibility, Temperature and Dew Point, Sea Level Pressure and Height of Pressure Surface, Pressure Tendency, Past Weather, See Also

Other articles related to "station model, station":

Surface Weather Observation - Use of Weather Maps
... is then plotted onto a weather map using the station model ... A station model is a symbolic illustration showing the weather occurring at a given reporting station ... Meteorologists created the station model to plot a number of weather elements in a small space on weather maps ...
1880s - Technology
... Copper electrical wires would then connect the station with other buildings, allowing for electricity distribution ... Pearl Street Station was the first central power plant in the United States ... By 1884, Pearl Street Station was serving 508 customers with 10,164 lamps ...

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