State University of New York At Fredonia

The State University of New York at Fredonia (also known as SUNY Fredonia, Fredonia State University and formerly SUNY College at Fredonia) is a four-year liberal arts college located in Fredonia, New York, United States; it is a constituent college of the State University of New York. The college's motto is "Where Success is a Tradition."

SUNY Fredonia was one of the state teachers' colleges traditionally specializing in music education, but now offers a large number of programs in many areas, including a growing graduate division. The most popular areas include Communication, Music, Education, and programs of the Social Sciences. There are 82 majors and 41 minors.

The SUNY Fredonia campus, located in Chautauqua County (southwest of Buffalo) was designed by prominent architects I.M. Pei and Henry N. Cobb in 1968.

Read more about State University Of New York At Fredonia:  Architecture, Academic and Administrative Buildings On and Off Campus, Dining Options, Residence Halls, On Campus Student Media, Greek Life, Presidents, Athletics, Near The Shores of Old Lake Erie, Resources

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State University Of New York At Fredonia - Resources
... Archive and Special Collections, SUNY Fredonia, Daniel E ... History of the College at Fredonia ... The Leader, 27 January 1936 "The Historical Development of State University of New York College..." (PH.D diss ...

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