St John's College, University of Sydney

St John's College, University Of Sydney

St John's College, or the College of St John the Evangelist, is a residential College within the University of Sydney.

Established in 1857, the College of St John the Evangelist is the oldest Roman Catholic university college and second-oldest university college in Australia. St John's is a co-educational community of 267 undergraduate and postgraduate students. The Acting Rector, Mr Adrian Diethelm, has governed the college since 2013.

Read more about St John's College, University Of Sydney:  History, Architecture, Student Life, Governance, Rectors, Visitors

Other articles related to "university, st, john":

Robert Watson-Watt - Early Years
... and Brechin High School, he was accepted to University College, Dundee (which was then part of the University of St Andrews but became the University of Dundee in 1967) ... assistantship by Professor William Peddie, the holder of the Chair of Physics at University College, Dundee from 1907 to 1942 ... Chair of Electrical Engineering was established at University College, Dundee ...
David Eddings - Biography
... He graduated with a BA from Reed College in 1954 and an MA from the University of Washington in 1961 ...
College - Other Uses
... Examples are an electoral college, the College of Arms, a college of canons, and the College of Cardinals ...
St. John Fisher College
... St ... John Fisher College is a private liberal arts college located in Pittsford, New York, United States, an eastern suburb of Rochester ...
St. John Fisher College - History
... St ... John Fisher College was founded as a men's college in 1948 by the Basilian Fathers and with the aid of Father James E ... Recently, the university has experienced a large increase in on-campus housing, student enrollment, new facilities, and the establishment of both the Wegmans School of Nursing, and The ...

Famous quotes containing the words sydney and/or university:

    What is more hopelessly uninteresting than accomplished liberty? Great swarming, teeming Sydney flowing out into these myriads of bungalows, like shallow waters spreading, undyked. And what then? Nothing. No inner life, no high command, no interest in anything finally.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Poetry presents indivisible wholes of human consciousness, modified and ordered by the stringent requirements of form. Prose, aiming at a definite and concrete goal, generally suppresses everything inessential to its purpose; poetry, existing only to exhibit itself as an aesthetic object, aims only at completeness and perfection of form.
    Richard Harter Fogle, U.S. critic, educator. The Imagery of Keats and Shelley, ch. 1, University of North Carolina Press (1949)