Spoken

Spoken is the past participle form of "to speak".

Spoken may also refer to:

  • Spoken (band), a Christian rock group from Arkansas
  • Spoken (album), an album by Spoken

Other articles related to "spoken":

Culture Of Nepal - Languages and Literature
... See also Nepali literature As per 2001 census, at least 92 different living languages are spoken in Nepal, though other studies list 123 living languages ... The major languages of Nepal (percent spoken as mother tongue) are Nepali (49%), Maithili (12%), Bhojpuri (8%), Tharu (6%), Tamang (5%), Newari/Nepal Bhasa (4%), Magar (3%), Awadhi (2%), Thulung (Rai) (3 ... The remaining languages are each spoken as mother tongue by less than one percent of the population, for example Dura ...
Papiamento
... Papiamento (or Papiamentu) is the most widely spoken language on the Caribbean ABC islands, having the official status on the islands of Aruba and Curaçao ... Papiamento has two main dialects Papiamento, spoken primarily on Aruba and Papiamentu, spoken primarily on Bonaire and Curaçao ...
Versant
... suite of tests are computerized tests of spoken language available from Pearson ... Versant tests were the first fully automated tests of spoken language to use advanced speech processing technology (including speech recognition) to assess the spoken language ...
MIMAROPA - Languages
... Tagalog is widely spoken in the region ... In Marinduque, Tagalog is spoken with a unique blend of Bicolano and Visayan languages ... In the interior of Mindoro, various languages are spoken by Mangyans, and they include Iraya, Alangan, Tawbuid, Hanunoo, Tadyawan, Buhid, and Ratagnon ...
Aymara Language
... Aymara (Aymar aru) is an Aymaran language spoken by the Aymara people of the Andes ... It is also spoken around the Lake Titicaca region of southern Peru and, to a much lesser extent, by some communities in northern Chile and in Northwest Argentina ... Aymara is related to its more widely spoken neighbour, Quechua ...

Famous quotes containing the word spoken:

    I have never yet spoken from a public platform about women in industry that someone has not said, “But things are far better than they used to be.” I confess to impatience with persons who are satisfied with a dangerously slow tempo of progress for half of society in an age which requires a much faster tempo than in the days that “used to be.” Let us use what might be instead of what has been as our yardstick!
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877–?)

    Yet poetry, though the last and finest result, is a natural fruit. As naturally as the oak bears an acorn, and the vine a gourd, man bears a poem, either spoken or done. It is the chief and most memorable success, for history is but a prose narrative of poetic deeds.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    In a pure society, the subject of marriage would not be so often avoided,—from shame and not from reverence, winked out of sight, and hinted at only; but treated naturally and simply,—perhaps simply avoided like the kindred mysteries. If it cannot be spoken of for shame, how can it be acted of? But, doubtless, there is far more purity, as well as more impurity, than is apparent.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)