Spin Casting

Spin casting, also known as centrifugal rubber mold casting (CRMC), is a method of utilizing centrifugal force to produce castings from a rubber mold. Typically, a disc-shaped mold is spun along its central axis at a set speed. The casting material, usually molten metal or liquid thermoset plastic is then poured in through an opening at the top-center of the mold. The filled mold then continues to spin as the metal solidifies or the thermoset plastic sets.

Read more about Spin CastingGeneral Description, Silicone Molds, Similar Processes, Applications

Other articles related to "spin casting, casting":

Spin Casting - Applications
... Spin casting is very commonly used for the manufacture of the following types of items Gaming miniatures and Figurines – in both metal and plastics ... Rapid prototyping / rapid manufacturing – spin casting is an excellent adjunct process as it allows the quick and efficient production of fully functional copies from fragile rapid prototype models ... In this way, spin casting is accessible to an arguably broader range of applications than competing technologies ...
Fishing Rod - Types - Spin and Bait Casting Rods
... Spin casting rods are rods designed to hold a spin casting reel, which are normally mounted above the handle ... Spin casting rods also have small eyes and, frequently, a forefinger grip trigger ... They are very similar to bait casting rods, to the point where either type of reel may be used on a particular rod ...

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