South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut - Release - Critical Reception

Critical Reception

The film was released to generally positive critical reception; Rita Kempley of The Washington Post called the film "outrageously profane" and "wildly funny", noting that "While censorship is the filmmakers' main target favorite monster is the Motion Picture Association of America, self-appointed guardians of the nation's chastity. It's all in good dirty fun and in service of their pro-tolerance theme." Stephen Holden of The New York Times heavily praised the film, regarding the film's "self-justifying moral" as "about mass entertainment, censorship and freedom of speech." He also praised Cartman's subjection to the V-chip, which he called "the movie's sharpest satirical twist, reminiscent of A Clockwork Orange. Entertainment Weekly graded the film an A- and praised the film's message in a post-Columbine society, as well as Parker and Shaiman's musical numbers, which "brilliantly parody / honor the conventions of Broadway show tunes and, especially, the Disney-formula ditties of Alan Menken." The Washington Post's Michael O'Sullivan neutrally regarded the offensive nature of the film, commenting "Yes, the lampooning is more broad than incisive, but under the bludgeoning of this blunt instrument very few sacred cows are left standing." In a review that was later quoted on the film's original home video cover, Richard Corliss from Time warned viewers "You may laugh yourself sick -- as sick as this ruthlessly funny movie is." Corliss would later name the film his fifth favorite animated film of all-time.

The film had its fair share of critical detractors, without noting the conservative family groups offended by the film's humor. Jack Matthews of the Daily News suggested the film's running time made Parker and Stone "run out of ideas", while Roger Ebert stated that the "vicious social satire" of the film both "offended" and "amazed" him. Ebert called the film "the year's most slashing political commentary", but also said "It is too long and runs out of steam, but it serves as a signpost for our troubled times. Just for the information it contains about the way we live now, thoughtful and concerned people should see it. After all, everyone else will." It has a "Certified Fresh" rating of 81% on Rotten Tomatoes; the site's consensus stating "Its jokes are profoundly bold and rude but incredibly funny at the same time." It also has a 74 out of 100 rating, which indicates "generally favorable reviews", at Metacritic.

Read more about this topic:  South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, Release

Other articles related to "critical reception, reception, critical":

Pokémon Yellow - Reception - Critical Reception
... Reception Aggregate scores Aggregator Score GameRankings 85.47% Review scores Publication Score Electronic Gaming Monthly 8.5/10 Game Informer 6.5/10 GameSpot 8.9/10 IGN 10/10 Nintendo ...
Chess (musical) - Broadway Staged Production, U.S. (1988) - History - Critical Reception
... A few reviewers, however, praised it very highly ... William A ...
South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut - Release - Critical Reception
... The film was released to generally positive critical reception Rita Kempley of The Washington Post called the film "outrageously profane" and "wildly funny", noting that "While censorship is the ... The film had its fair share of critical detractors, without noting the conservative family groups offended by the film's humor ...
The Apu Trilogy - Critical Reception
... This extract from the South African author J ... M ...

Famous quotes containing the words reception and/or critical:

    Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind of reception it meets in the world, and that so very few are offended with it.
    Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)

    A third variety of drama ... begins as tragedy with scraps of fun in it ... and ends in comedy without mirth in it, the place of mirth being taken by a more or less bitter and critical irony.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)