South Allegheny Middle/Senior High School

South Allegheny Middle/Senior High School is part of the South Allegheny School District located in Allegheny County, PA. The building houses both middle school students (grades 7 and 8) and high school students (grades 9 through 12). The school serves students from Glassport, Port Vue, Liberty, Lincoln, and parts of Elizabeth.

The school provides all of its students with curriculum aligned to Pennsylvania standards, as well as the opportunity to attend Steel Center Vocational Technical School.

Read more about South Allegheny Middle/Senior High SchoolAthletics, Alma Mater, Notable Alumni

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