South African Nationality Law

South African Nationality Law

South Africa rewrote its nationality law since the end of Apartheid in 1994 and the establishment of majority rule in the country under the African National Congress. The 1995 South African Citizenship Act did away with the previous Apartheid-era 1949 and 1970 acts which had granted bantustan citizenship to the country's African majority and inferior levels of citizenship to the country's Asian and coloured minorities.

Read more about South African Nationality Law:  Citizenship By Birth in South Africa, South African Citizenship By Descent, Naturalisation As A South African Citizen, Dual Nationality, British Nationality and South Africa

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... Following South Africa's return to the Commonwealth in 1994, South Africans are treated as Commonwealth citizens in the United Kingdom ... in terms of eligibility for British citizenship, and South Africans must meet the same rules for registration or naturalization as citizens of any other country ...

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