South African Nationality Law

South African Nationality Law

South Africa rewrote its nationality law since the end of Apartheid in 1994 and the establishment of majority rule in the country under the African National Congress. The 1995 South African Citizenship Act did away with the previous Apartheid-era 1949 and 1970 acts which had granted bantustan citizenship to the country's African majority and inferior levels of citizenship to the country's Asian and coloured minorities.

Read more about South African Nationality Law:  Citizenship By Birth in South Africa, South African Citizenship By Descent, Naturalisation As A South African Citizen, Dual Nationality, British Nationality and South Africa

Other articles related to "south, south african, south african nationality law, south africans":

October 1 - Births
2009) 1922 – Kim Ki-young, South Korean director (d. 2001) 1928 – Laurence Harvey, Lithuanian-South African actor (d ... Robert Rey, Brazilian surgeon 1961 – Corrie van Zyl, South African cricketer 1962 – Esai Morales, American actor 1962 – Paul Walsh, English footballer 1963 – Jean-Den ...
citizenship" class="article_title_2">South African Nationality Law - British Nationality and South Africa - Commonwealth Citizenship
... Following South Africa's return to the Commonwealth in 1994, South Africans are treated as Commonwealth citizens in the United Kingdom ... specific concessions in terms of eligibility for British citizenship, and South Africans must meet the same rules for registration or naturalization as citizens of any other country ...

Famous quotes containing the words law, nationality, south and/or african:

    The decisions of law courts should never be printed: in the long run, they form a counterauthority to the law.
    Denis Diderot (1713–1784)

    Rarely do American parents deliberately teach their children to hate members of another racial, religious, or nationality group. Many parents, however, communicate the prevailing racial attitudes to their children in subtle and sometimes unconscious ways.
    Kenneth MacKenzie Clark (20th century)

    During Prohibition days, when South Carolina was actively advertising the iodine content of its vegetables, the Hell Hole brand of ‘liquid corn’ was notorious with its waggish slogan: ‘Not a Goiter in a Gallon.’
    —Administration in the State of Sout, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    All great religions, in order to escape absurdity, have to admit a dilution of agnosticism. It is only the savage, whether of the African bush or the American gospel tent, who pretends to know the will and intent of God exactly and completely.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)