South African Military Academy

The South African Military Academy is based on similar principles as that of the Military Academy system of the United States (United States Military Academy United States Naval Academy United States Air Force Academy). The Academy is a military unit of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) housing the Faculty of Military Science of the University of Stellenbosch.

It prepares candidate officers and midshipmen of all the Arms of Service morally, mentally, and physically to be professional officers in the SANDF.

Read more about South African Military AcademyCampus, Students, Faculty, Programs, History

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October 1 - Births
2009) 1922 – Kim Ki-young, South Korean director (d. 2001) 1928 – Laurence Harvey, Lithuanian-South African actor (d ... wrestler and manager 1961 – Robert Rey, Brazilian surgeon 1961 – Corrie van Zyl, South African cricketer 1962 – Esai Morales, American actor 1962 – Paul ...
South African Military Academy - History
... The Academy was established on 1 April 1950 under the auspices of the University of Pretoria, as a branch of the South African Military College (now the South ...

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