Solidarity (South African Trade Union)

Solidarity (South African Trade Union)

Solidarity (Afrikaans: Solidariteit) is a South African trade union that negotiates on behalf of its members and attempts to protect workers' rights. Although the union is often involved in issues of policial import, it does not align or formally affiliate itself with any political party. Solidarity is a trade union within the Christian tradition of unionism. This differentiates it from the majority of other South African trade unions that have socialist ideologies. Solidarity has a broader focus than workers' rights and includes defending civil rights for its members.

The union has positioned itself as a vehicle for minorities in South Africa to have their voices heard. Its membership is mainly, but not exclusively white people.

Read more about Solidarity (South African Trade Union):  History, Core Labour Union Functions, Litigation

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Solidarity (South African Trade Union) - Additional Operations - Express Employment Professionals
... Solidarity owns several franchises of Express Employment Professionals, an international personnel agency ... This enables the union to attempt to find work for its members who are without jobs ...

Famous quotes containing the words trade, african and/or solidarity:

    Teaching your child a trade is better than giving him a thousand ounces of gold.
    Chinese proverb.

    We live in a highly industrialized society and every member of the Black nation must be as academically and technologically developed as possible. To wage a revolution, we need competent teachers, doctors, nurses, electronics experts, chemists, biologists, physicists, political scientists, and so on and so forth. Black women sitting at home reading bedtime stories to their children are just not going to make it.
    Frances Beale, African American feminist and civil rights activist. The Black Woman, ch. 14 (1970)

    It is not in how one soul approaches another but in how it withdraws that I know its affinity and solidarity with the other.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)