Solid Gold (TV Series)

Solid Gold (TV Series)

Solid Gold is an American syndicated music television series that debuted on September 13, 1980. Like many other shows of its genre, such as American Bandstand, Solid Gold featured musical performances and various other elements such as music videos. What set Solid Gold apart was a group of dancers in revealing costumes who at various points in the program performed various (and sometimes borderline risqué) dances to the top ten hits of the week. Many other specials aired in which the dancers would dance to older pop hits as well. Reviews of the show were not always positive, with The New York Times referring to it as "the pop music show that is its own parody... mini-dramas...of covetousness, lust and aerobic toning--routines that typically have a minimal connection with the songs that back them up."

The series ran until July 23, 1988, and it was usually transmitted on Saturdays in the early evening. In 1986, Solid Gold added the current year to its title, so in the seventh season the show was known as Solid Gold '86/'87. For the eighth and last season the program became known as Solid Gold In Concert, reflecting the addition of more live performances than had previously been featured on the program in the past.

Read more about Solid Gold (TV Series):  Production Background, Awards, Pop Culture References, Episode Status

Other articles related to "solid":

Solid Gold (TV Series) - Episode Status
... All episodes of SolidGold exist,including the 1979 pilot ... Neither CBS Television Distribution nor Paramount Home Video,however,had made them available on home video,DVD or Blu-ray as of early October of 2012 ...

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