Social Practice

Social practice is a theory within psychology that seeks to determine the link between practice and context within social situations. Emphasized as a commitment to change, social practice occurs in two forms: activity and inquiry. Most often applied within the context of human development, social practice involves knowledge production and the theorization and analysis of both institutional and intervention practices.

Read more about Social PracticeOverview: Background in Psychology, Social Practice As Activity, Social Practice As Inquiry

Other articles related to "social practice, social":

Social Practice - Areas of Interest - Art
... Art is considered a medium for social practice as there is increasing pressure within art education to work collaboratively through social and participatory ... involvement in political and interventionist projects, which highlight the importance of social engagement through art ...
Participatory Art
... categorized under terms including relational art, social practice, community art, and new genre public art ... writer Eric Gold describes "an artistic tradition called 'social practice,' which refers to works of art in which the artist, audience, and their interactions with one another ... pigment and canvas, and a sculptor wood or metal, the social practice artist often creates a scenario in which the audience is invited to participate ...

Famous quotes containing the words practice and/or social:

    Know how to be content and you will never be disgraced; practice self-restraint and you will never be in danger.
    —Chinese proverb.

    Laozi.

    School success is not predicted by a child’s fund of facts or a precocious ability to read as much as by emotional and social measures; being self-assured and interested: knowing what kind of behavior is expected and how to rein in the impulse to misbehave; being able to wait, to follow directions, and to turn to teachers for help; and expressing needs while getting along with other children.
    Daniel Goleman (20th century)