Situated Cognition

Situated cognition is a theory that poses that knowing is inseparable from doing by arguing that all knowledge is situated in activity bound to social, cultural and physical contexts.

Under this assumption, which requires an epistemological shift from empiricism, situativity theorists suggest a model of knowledge and learning that requires thinking on the fly rather than the storage and retrieval of conceptual knowledge. In essence, cognition cannot be separated from the context. Instead knowing exists, in situ, inseparable from context, activity, people, culture, and language. Therefore, learning is seen in terms of an individual's increasingly effective performance across situations rather than in terms of an accumulation of knowledge, since what is known is co-determined by the agent and the context. This perspective rejects mind-body dualism and person-environment dualism.

Read more about Situated CognitionHistory, Glossary, Externalism, Pedagogical Implications, Research Methodologies, Critiques of Situativity

Other articles related to "situated cognition, situated":

Situated Cognition - Critiques of Situativity
... In "Situated Action A Symbolic Interpretation" Vera and Simon wrote " ... the systems usually regarded as exemplifying Situated Action are thoroughly symbolic (and representational), and, to the extent that they are limited in these respects, have doubtful prospects for ... Simon (1996) summarized what they considered to be the four claims of situated learning and argued against each claim from a cognitivist perspective ...

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