Sitting Pretty (1948 Film) - Plot

Plot

Lawyer Harry (Young) and his wife Tacey King (O'Hara) have trouble retaining a nanny for their three young rambunctious boys. When the latest in a string of servants quits, Tacey advertises and hires Lynn Belvedere sight unseen, only to find out that Lynn is a dapper older man (Webb), one with many skills and achievements. Despite their misgivings (and Belvedere's declaration that he detests children), the Kings reluctantly agree to a trial period. Belvedere quickly wins over the kids, although his superior attitude annoys Harry.

When Harry has to go away on a business trip, Tacey agrees to take the baby and sleep over each night at the home of their friends, fellow lawyer Bill Philby (John Russell) and his wife Edna, just to squelch any possibility of scandal in their suburban community of Hummingbird Hill. Late that night, however, one of the boys becomes sick. Tacey rushes over. It turns out to be just a stomach ache, but nosy neighbor Clarence Appleton (Richard Haydn) notices the lights on and comes over to investigate. He starts spreading scandalous rumors linking Belvedere and Tacey romantically. The gossip eventually reaches Horatio J. Hammond (Ed Begley), Harry's boss. When Harry returns triumphant from his trip, Hammond tells him that Tacey is endangering the law firm's reputation. Though Harry does not believe the stories, he still thinks it would be best if Belvedere found other employment, but is persuaded by his wife and children to change his mind.

Later, Tacey and Edna attend a night lecture. Afterward, they go for a snack in a fancy restaurant. There they encounter Belvedere on his day off. Belvedere invites Tacey to dance. They are spotted dancing cheek to cheek by Appleton and his equally inquisitive mother, and the malicious rumors start up again. This time, Harry is not so understanding. Insulted, Tacey quarrels with him and leaves for her parents.

Then, Belvedere's novel (described as "A Screaming Satire on suburban manners and morals") is published and becomes a national bestseller. It contains thinly veiled accounts of the unseemly behavior of Hummingbird Hill's residents, upsetting everyone. Tacey rushes home and is reconciled with her husband. Hammond fires Harry, and Bill too when he comes to defense of his friend. He decides to sue Belvedere, who is pleased, as he expects the action to increase already skyrocketing sales of his book. He hires Harry and Bill to defend him, then reveals the source of much of his information: Appleton. The informant flees, with Hammond and others in hot pursuit. Despite his new fame, Belvedere agrees to keep his job, as the novel is only the first volume of a trilogy.

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Famous quotes containing the word plot:

    We have defined a story as a narrative of events arranged in their time-sequence. A plot is also a narrative of events, the emphasis falling on causality. “The king died and then the queen died” is a story. “The king died, and then the queen died of grief” is a plot. The time sequence is preserved, but the sense of causality overshadows it.
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