Ship

Since the end of the age of sail a ship has been any large buoyant watercraft. Ships are generally distinguished from boats based on size and cargo or passenger capacity. Ships are used on lakes, seas, and rivers for a variety of activities, such as the transport of people or goods, fishing, entertainment, public safety, and warfare. Historically, a "ship" was a vessel with sails rigged in a specific manner.

Ships and boats have developed alongside mankind. In armed conflict and in daily life they have become an integral part of modern commercial and military systems. Fishing boats are used by millions of fishermen throughout the world. Military forces operate vessels for combat and to transport and support forces ashore. Commercial vessels, nearly 35,000 in number, carried 7.4 billion tons of cargo in 2007.

Ships were key in history's great explorations and scientific and technological development. Navigators such as Zheng He spread such inventions as the compass and gunpowder. Ships have been used for such purposes as colonization and the slave trade, and have served scientific, cultural, and humanitarian needs. After the 16th century, new crops that had come from and to the Americas via the European seafarers significantly contributed to the world's population growth. Maritime transport has shaped the world's economy into today's energy-intensive pattern.

Read more about Ship:  Nomenclature, Types of Ships, Architecture, Lifecycle, Measuring Ships, Ship Pollution, Buoyancy

Other articles related to "ship, ships":

USS Lexington (CV-16)
... She was renamed while under construction to commemorate the earlier ship ... This ship was the fifth US Navy ship to bear the name in honor of the Revolutionary War Battle of Lexington ...
USS Lexington (CV-16) - USS Lexington Museum
... On 15 June 1992, the ship was donated as a museum and now operates as the USS Lexington Museum on the Bay at 27°48'53 N, 97°23'19, 2914 North Shoreline Blvd, Corpus Christi, Texas ... The ship is carefully maintained, and areas of the ship previously off-limits are becoming open to the public every few years ... The ship's World War II-era gun battery is also being partially restored using guns salvaged from scrapped ships ...
USS Tarawa
... Two United States Navy ships have borne the name Tarawa, after the Pacific atoll that was the scene of a bloody fight in the Pacific War ... The second Tarawa (LHA-1) is an amphibious assault ship commissioned in 1976 ... This article includes a list of ships with the same or similar names ...
Queen Elizabeth 2 - History - Service History - Early Career
... the first "civilian" passenger to board the ship, on her voyage from the shipyard in Clydebank to drydock in Greenock ... in the rescue of some 500 passengers from the burning French Line ship Antilles ... Air Service and Special Boat Service team which parachuted into the sea to conduct a search of the ship ...
USNS Watertown (T-AGM-6)
... USNS Watertown (T-AGM-6) was a Watertown-class missile range instrumentation ship acquired by the U.S ... in 1960 and converted from her Victory ship cargo configuration to a missile tracking ship, a role she retained for eleven years before being placed out of service in 1971 ...

Famous quotes containing the word ship:

    Have you built your ship of death, O have you?
    O build your ship of death, for you will need it.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Positively I sit here, and look at Europe sink, first one deck disappearing, then another, and the whole ship slowly plunging bow-down into the abyss; until the nightmare gets to be howling. The Roman Empire was a trifle to it.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State!
    Sail on, O Union, strong and great!
    Humanity with all its fears,
    With all the hopes of future years,
    Is hanging breathless on thy fate!
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882)