Shift

Shift generally means to change (position).

Shift may refer to:

  • Gear shift, to change gears in a car
  • Shift work, an employment practice
  • Shift (weapon), an improvised knife used as a weapon
  • Shift (clothing), a simple kind of undergarment
  • Shift (ice hockey), a group of players in ice hockey

Read more about Shift:  Arts and Entertainment, Mathematics and Computing

Other articles related to "shift":

Blueshift (disambiguation)
... Blueshift or blue shift may also refer to "Blue Shift", a song by Hawkwind from their 1993 album Electric Tepee "Blue Shift" (short story), a science fiction ...
Heavy NP Shift
... Heavy NP shift" is a particular manifestation of shifting where a "heavy" noun phrase (NP) appears in a position to the right of its canonical position ... Ross (1967) may have been the first to look at heavy NP shift in some detail ...
Bathochromic Shift
... Bathochromic shift is a change of spectral band position in the absorption, reflectance, transmittance, or emission spectrum of a molecule to a longer wavelength (low ... than most other colors, this effect is also commonly called a red shift, although this usage is considered informal, and has no relation to Doppler shift or other wavelength-independent meanings of redshift ... A series of structurally related molecules in a substitution series can also show a bathochromic shift ...
Graveyard Shift (1987 Film)
... Graveyard Shift (also titled Central Park Drifter) is a 1987 Canadian horror film written and directed by Jerry Ciccoritti, and starring Michael A ... The film was originally entitled Graveyard Shift but when the film was released to video, the title was changed to Central Park Drifter (IMDB info) ...
Shift - Mathematics and Computing
... Shift key, a key on a computer keyboard Bit shift, a bitwise operator in computing Barrel shifter, a digital circuit that can shift a data word by a specified number of bits Arithmetic shift in ...

Famous quotes containing the word shift:

    The success of great scholars and thinkers is commonly a courtier-like success, not kingly, not manly. They make shift to live merely by conformity, practically as their fathers did, and are in no sense the progenitors of a nobler race of men.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    “Circumstantial evidence is a very tricky thing,” answered Holmes thoughtfully. “It may seem to point very straight to one thing, but if you shift your own point of view a little, you may find it pointing in an equally uncompromising manner to something entirely different.”
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930)

    I will use the world and sift it,
    To a thousand humors shift it,
    As you spin a cherry.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)