Shakespeare Theatre Company Production History

Shakespeare Theatre Company Production History

The Shakespeare Theatre Company is a regional theatre company located in Washington, United States. The theatre company focuses primarily on plays from the Shakespeare canon, but its seasons include works by other classic playwrights such as Euripides, Henrik Ibsen and Oscar Wilde.

The following is a chronological list of the productions that have been staged since its inception.

Read more about Shakespeare Theatre Company Production History:  1986-1987, 1987-1988, 1988-1989, 1989-1990, 1990-1991, 1991-1992, 1992-1993, 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1995-1996, 1996-1997, 1997-1998, 1998-1999, 1999-2000, 2000-2001, 2001-2002, 2002-2003, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012

Other articles related to "shakespeare theatre company production history, productions, shakespeare, theatre":

Shakespeare Theatre Company Production History - 2011-2012
... Full stage productions The Heir Apparent by Jean-Fran├žois Regnard translated by David Ives Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare The Two Gentlemen of Verona by ... by Samuel Beckett featuring John Hurt from Ireland's Gate Theatre ...

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    The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe? Why should not we have a poetry and philosophy of insight and not of tradition, and a religion by revelation to us, and not the history of theirs?
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    I really know nothing more criminal, more mean, and more ridiculous than lying. It is the production either of malice, cowardice, or vanity; and generally misses of its aim in every one of these views; for lies are always detected, sooner or later.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    Like an unseasonable stormy day,
    Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
    As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
    So high above his limits swells the rage
    Of Bolingbroke.
    —William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    To save the theatre, the theatre must be destroyed, the actors and actresses must all die of the plague. They poison the air, they make art impossible. It is not drama that they play, but pieces for the theatre. We should return to the Greeks, play in the open air; the drama dies of stalls and boxes and evening dress, and people who come to digest their dinner.
    Eleonora Duse (1859–1924)

    I hate the prostitution of the name of friendship to signify modish and worldly alliances. I much prefer the company of ploughboys and tin-peddlers, to the silken and perfumed amity which celebrates its days of encounter by a frivolous display, by rides in a curricle, and dinners at the best taverns.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)