Seven Ages of Rock

Seven Ages of Rock was a BBC Two series, co-produced by BBC Worldwide and VH1 Classic in 2007 about the history of rock music.

It comprised six 60-minute episodes (reduced to 48 minutes for VH1 Classic), with a final episode of 90 minutes, and was broadcast on Saturdays at 21:00 (repeated on BBC One on Sundays). Each episode focused on one type of rock music, each typified by one or two artists or bands. The series producer was William Naylor, and the executive producer for the BBC was Michael Poole, a former editor of the 1990s BBC music, arts and culture programme The Late Show. The production was based at BBC Bristol and each programme was narrated by Julian Rhind-Tutt on the BBC and Dennis Hopper on VH1 classic.

The series also included additional material broadcast on BBC radio and available on the BBC website.

Read more about Seven Ages Of RockSeries Structure, Episodes, Additional Material, Audio CD, Songs Featured in The Series, Featured Artists Who Are Listed Only On The BBC Website

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