Sepsis

Sepsis (/ˈsɛpsɨs/; from the Greek σῆψις: the state of putrefaction and decay) is a potentially deadly medical condition characterized by a whole-body inflammatory state (called a systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS) that is triggered by an infection. The body may develop this inflammatory response by the immune system to microbes in the blood, urine, lungs, skin, or other tissues. A popular term for sepsis is blood poisoning. Severe sepsis is the systemic inflammatory response, infection and the presence of organ dysfunction.

Septicemia (also septicaemia or septicæmia ) is a related medical term referring to the presence of pathogenic organisms in the bloodstream, leading to sepsis. The term has not been sharply defined. It has been inconsistently used in the past by medical professionals, for example as a synonym of bacteremia, causing some confusion.

Sepsis is usually treated with intravenous fluids and antibiotics. If fluid replacement isn't sufficient to maintain blood pressure, vasopressors can be used. Mechanical ventilation and dialysis may be needed to support the function of the lungs and kidneys, respectively. To guide therapy, a central venous catheter and an arterial catheter may be placed; measurement of other hemodynamic variables (such as cardiac output, mixed venous oxygen saturation or stroke volume variation) may also be used. Sepsis patients require preventive measures for deep vein thrombosis, stress ulcers and pressure ulcers, unless other conditions prevent this. Some might benefit from tight control of blood sugar levels with insulin (targeting stress hyperglycemia). The use of corticosteroids is controversial. Activated drotrecogin alfa (recombinant activated protein C), originally marketed for severe sepsis, has not been found to be helpful, and has recently been withdrawn from sale.

Read more about Sepsis:  Signs and Symptoms, Cause, Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, Management, Prognosis, Epidemiology, History, Society and Culture

Other articles related to "sepsis":

Surviving Sepsis Campaign - Using Bundles in Health Care
... the complex processes of the care of patients with severe sepsis ... Each hospital's sepsis protocol may be customized, but it must meet the standards created by the bundle ... Recent updates to Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommend 30ml/kg bolus ...
Surviving Sepsis Campaign - Relevance
... Mortality associated with severe sepsis remains high at 30-50% ... Approximately 1400 people die from sepsis each day throughout the world ... there are approximately 750,000 new sepsis cases each year, with at least 210,000 fatalities and this is reported to be same throughout Europe ...
Sepsis - Society and Culture
... was established to educate people about sepsis and to improve patient outcomes with sepsis, entitled the "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" ... published an evidence-based review of management strategies for severe sepsis, with the aim to publish a complete set of guidelines in subsequent years ... raising concerns regarding the use of hydroxyethyl starch in sepsis ...
Septicaemia (band) - History - The Name
... The term improperly mixes components of bacteraemia and sepsis, and has been abandoned as a concept ... Sepsis is usually treated in the intensive care unit with intravenous fluids and antibiotics ... Sepsis patients require preventive measures for deep vein thrombosis, stress ulcers and pressure ulcers, unless other conditions prevent this ...
Surviving Sepsis Campaign
... The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) is a global initiative to bring together professional organizations in reducing mortality from sepsis ... is to create an international collaborative effort to improve the treatment of sepsis and reduce the high mortality rate associated with the condition ... The Surviving Sepsis Campaign and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement have teamed up to achieve a 25 percent reduction in sepsis mortality by 2009 ...