Seattle Sounders–Portland Timbers Rivalry

Seattle Sounders–Portland Timbers Rivalry

The Portland –Seattle rivalry is a soccer rivalry between the Portland Timbers and Seattle Sounders soccer teams. The rivalry pre-dates the current teams in both cities, back to the North American Soccer League days, and has since grown into one of the largest and most bitter rivalries in American soccer. The rivalry has spanned across several leagues including the USL First Division, A-League, NASL, and Major League Soccer. According to many players, the Seattle–Portland rivalry is one of the only true derbies that is present in American soccer. Alan Hinton, a former English international and ex-Sounders coach, has compared the rivalry to those seen in the English Premier League. It is considered to be one of the most intense rivalries in the United States.

Seattle and Portland have had rivalries based on various sports teams. A heated rivalry surrounded the Portland Buckaroos and Seattle Totems of the minor-league Western Hockey League in the 1960s. Later, some fans supported the Thunderbirds or Winterhawks hockey teams. This rivalry "naturally translated into soccer" according to one fan. The two cities also had a rivalry between the SuperSonics and Trail Blazers of the NBA, until the SuperSonics relocated to Oklahoma City in 2008.

Read more about Seattle Sounders–Portland Timbers Rivalry:  Supporter Groups, Players and Transfers, Cups, Results

Famous quotes containing the words rivalry, seattle and/or timbers:

    Sisters define their rivalry in terms of competition for the gold cup of parental love. It is never perceived as a cup which runneth over, rather a finite vessel from which the more one sister drinks, the less is left for the others.
    Elizabeth Fishel (20th century)

    I once heard of a murderer who propped his two victims up against a chess board in sporting attitudes and was able to get as far as Seattle before his crime was discovered.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    The man who is rich in fancy thinks that his wagon is already built; poor fool, he does not know that there are a hundred timbers to a wagon.
    Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.)